Your National Cleaners Association

Member Login

Welcome to The National Cleaners Association Website.

All cleaners are welcome to use different areas of the site, there is a Members Only area along with a Platinum Members Only Area. We hope you’ll consider joining our organization if you own a dry cleaning store, or are a supplier to our industry.

Our members have told us that we consistently add value, and help them with all of the issues that face them in business today. 

We also provide our members with Garment Care Alerts having to do with special garments that have found to be problematic in cleaning.

Members are also provided with an online Marketing Toolkit, that will help you pick up photos for ads or brochures, and also there are a number of hang tags you might want to download and print.


Cleaners Act Now!

DO NOT DELAY.  Check the dates on your permit NOW- Then visit the members only site and look under forms

NCA Events - From our Texcare Show to Brainstorming: our events are great to attend for learning, networking and finding out about the newest innovations.

NCA Classes -Download the schedule and application or visit the even calendar.

NCA Resources - Everything you might need from insurance to credits cards to websites are available to you at our various membership levels. Check out our members only lounge.

Advantages of Membership - Training classes, garments analysis, webinars, consulting: NCA (National Cleaners Association) is your personal advocate in the dry cleaning industry.

Coats For Kids 2022 Golf Outing

Planning for Brainstorming 2023


NCA Updates

NCA is here to help!

How can we help you?

Is your Dry Cleaner on Alexa and Google?

Is your Website ADA Compliant?

How are you staying in touch with your customer?

COVID-!9 Updates


If you have any questions or need assistance feel free to give us a call!
212-967-3002

Does your state require training? Click here to check

Are you current with your
New York
Sexual Harassments Training!
In New York state you MUST be trained yearly! 

Call Ann or Dawn @ 212-967-3002

WHY JOIN 

Our members have told us that we consistently add value, and help them with all of the issues that face them in business today. We have a full dry cleaning facility for training newbies in our business as well as refresher courses for veteran dry cleaners.

Latest news

  • 2 Mar 2022 6:00 AM | Dawn Hargrove-Avery (Administrator)

    Bleaching Chemicals

    Bleaching chemicals are used to react with a stain in order to render it colorless (camouflage it). Some types of bleaching agents will also whiten or brighten fabrics. The bleaching action either adds oxygen to the stain (oxygen bleach) or removes oxygen from the stain (reducing bleach). Since bleaching must be done in the presence of water, the bleaching agent must either contain water or be mixed with water.

    Summary on Bleaches

    1. Bleaches do not remove soils; therefore, the garment must have been dry cleaned or laundered prior to the application of the bleaching agent.

    2. Test the fabric on an unexposed area of the garment to test for colorfastness.

    3. Since bleaching agents become more aggressive when used with acids or alkalis, test for colorfastness with the chemical used to catalyze the bleaching agent

    4. Bleaching agents will double in strength (and will become more aggressive) for every 18º F. of heat applied.

    5. Bleaching agents are accelerated by metals. Only use plastic buckets or epoxy plastic or stainless steel sinks.

    6. Because bleaching agents can harm fabrics and dyes, they are used as the last step for stain removal.

    Rules for Bleaching

    1. Always bleach clean garments.

    2. Never crowd the bleach bath.

    3. Bleaching agents should be thoroughly mixed and dissolved before immersing the garment in the solution

    4. Rinse and neutralize bleaching agents after use.

    Oxidizing Bleaches

    Hydrogen Peroxide

    1. Contains stabilizers that prevent the loss of potency.

    2. Should be kept refrigerated

    3. Accelerated by ammonia and heat (will become more aggressive on dyes- test)

    4. Use 3% 10 Volume Hydrogen Peroxide

    5. Used primarily as a spotting board bleach.

    6. Used to remove the last traces of tannin, protein, and scorch stains

    Sodium Perborate

    1. Is alkaline by nature

    2. Accelerated b an alkali (not recommended)

    3. Purchased in powdered form.

    4. Used primarily as a bath bleach for the removal of tannins, proteins, some inks, and topical medications.

    5. Used on silk and wool as a whitening agent

    6. Slow acting bleach

    7. Use 2ounces per gallon of water at 100ºF.

    8. Must be neutralized with an acid bath (sour).

    9. Safe on all fibers and some dyes.

    Sodium Percarbonate

    1. Similar to sodium perborate.

    2. Releases oxygen more rapidly

    3. Dissolves more rapidly in cooler temperatures of water.

    4. Use the same way as sodium perborate.

    Sodium Hypochlorite (Chlorine bleach-Not commonly used)

    1. Cannot be used on animal fibers such as wool or silk.

    2. Cannot come into contact with ammonia- will emit harmful toxic gasses!

    3. Dangerous to most dyes

    4. Alkaline by nature.

    5. Accelerated by acids.

    6. Bath mixture- ½ ounce per gallon of water (bath)

    7. Board mixture- dilute 50-1 for board use.

    8. Must always be followed by applying an anti-chlor (sodium bisulfite or sodium hydrosulfite).

    Potassium Permanganate

    1. Strongest of all bleaching agents- dangerous on most fibers and dyestuffs!

    2. Sold in liquid form

    3. Generally used on the spotting board

    4. Can be diluted for restorations. Test for colorfastness of fabric before using.

    5. Alkaline by nature- accelerated by acids.

    6. May cause brown discolorations that can be corrected by applying

    hydrogen peroxide.

    Reducing Bleaches

    Sodium Bisulfite

    1. Is sold in powdered form as a mild reducing bleach.

    2. Use 1-2 ounces per gallon of water

    3. Can be used as an anti-chlor.

    4. Can be used as a mild whitening agent.

    5. Can be used on the board for the removal of some tannin stains that contain sugars, dyes and inks

    6. While used primarily as a bath bleach, it can also be used on the board

    Sodium Hydrosulfite

    1. Is sold in powdered form under different trade names

    2. Used for the removal of dyes and fugitive prints, as well as some oxidized tannin stains.

    3. Can be used as a whitening agent

    4. Used primarily as a bath bleach (1-2 ounces per gallon of water.

    5. Can be used as a bleach on the spotting board.

    6. Acid by nature, accelerated by acids.

    7. Should never come into contact with metal tubs, metal garment trimmings, or fabrics that contain metals or metallic coatings.

    8. Safe on most fabrics, unsafe on most dyestuffs.

    Titanium Sulfate

    1. Used to remove dye stains

    2. Primarily used as a spotting board bleach

    3. Cannot be used as a whitening agent

    4. Never use with an alkali- can cause permanent discolorations.

    5. Is a blue-black liquid sold by various manufacturers?

    6. Is acid by nature and will become more aggressive when acids are applied.

    7. Dilute in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.

    8. Safe on most fabrics, unsafe on most dyes.

    9. Rust remover will often correct discolorations caused by alkali, chemical reactions with other bleaches and metals.


  • 1 Mar 2022 5:44 PM | Dawn Hargrove-Avery (Administrator)

    Eidl loans made in 2020 repayment begins 24 months from the date of the loan

    Eidl loans made in 2021 repayment begins 18 months from the date of the loan

    Log in to your portal and it should have directions on how to pay. You should have also received a statement that tells you to go to

    1. https://www.pay.gov

    2. search for 1201 borrower payment form

    3. submit payment using borrower payments form


  • 22 Feb 2022 5:42 PM | Dawn Hargrove-Avery (Administrator)

    Information made available from the SBA- Click here to read the full article.

    Common threats

    Cyber-attacks are constantly evolving, but business owners should at least be aware of the most common types.

    Malware

    Malware (malicious software) is an umbrella term that refers to software intentionally designed to cause damage to a computer, server, client, or computer network. Malware can include viruses and ransomware.

    Viruses

    Viruses are harmful programs intended to spread from computer to computer (and other connected devices). Viruses are intended to give cybercriminals access to your system.

    Ransomware

    Ransomware is a specific type of malware that infects and restricts access to a computer until a ransom is paid. Ransomware is usually delivered through phishing emails and exploits unpatched vulnerabilities in software.

    Phishing

    Phishing is a type of cyber-attack that uses email or a malicious website to infect your machine with malware or collect your sensitive information. Phishing emails appear as though they’ve been sent from a legitimate organization or known individual. These emails often entice users to click on a link or open an attachment containing malicious code. After the code is run, your computer may become infected with malware.

    Assess your business risk

    The first step in improving your cybersecurity is understanding your risk of an attack, and where you can make the biggest improvements.

    A cybersecurity risk assessment can identify where a business is vulnerable, and help you create a plan of action—which should include user training, guidance on securing email platforms, and advice on protecting the business’s information assets.

    Planning and assessment tools

    There’s no substitute for dedicated IT support—whether an employee or external consultant—but businesses of more limited means can still take measures to improve their cybersecurity.

    FCC Planning Tool
    The Federal Communications Commission offers a 
    cybersecurity planning tool to help you build a strategy based on your unique business needs.

    Cyber Resilience Review
    The Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) 
    Cyber Resilience Review (CRR) is a non-technical assessment to evaluate operational resilience and cybersecurity practices. You can either do the assessment yourself, or request a facilitated assessment by DHS cybersecurity professionals.

    Cyber Hygiene Vulnerability Scanning
    DHS also offers free 
    cyber hygiene vulnerability scanning for small businesses. This service can help secure your internet-facing systems from weak configuration and known vulnerabilities. You will receive a weekly report for your action.

    Supply Chain Risk Management

    Use the Supply Chain Risk Management Toolkit to help shield your business information and communications technology from sophisticated supply chain attacks. Developed by the DHS Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Agency (CISA), this toolkit will help you raise awareness and reduce the impacts of supply chain risks.

    Cybersecurity best practices

    Train your employees

    Employees and emails are a leading cause of data breaches for small businesses because they are a direct path into your systems. Training employees on basic internet best practices can go a long way in preventing cyber-attacks. The Department of Homeland Security’s "Stop.Think.Connect" campaign offers training and other materials. 

    Training topics to cover include:

    o    Spotting a phishing email

    o    Using good browsing practices

    o    Avoiding suspicious downloads

    o    Creating strong passwords

    o    Protecting sensitive customer and vendor information

    o    Maintaining good cyber hygiene

     

    Use antivirus software and keep it updated
    Make sure each of your business’s computers is equipped with antivirus software and antispyware and updated regularly. Such software is readily available online from a variety of vendors. All software vendors regularly provide patches and updates to their products to correct security problems and improve functionality. Configure all software to install updates automatically.

    Secure your networks
    Safeguard your Internet connection by using a firewall and encrypting information. If you have a Wi-Fi network, make sure it is secure and hidden. To hide your Wi-Fi network, set up your wireless access point or router so it does not broadcast the network name, known as the Service Set Identifier (SSID). Password-protect access to the router.

    Use strong passwords
    Using strong passwords is an easy way to improve your cybersecurity. Be sure to use different passwords for your different accounts. A strong password includes:

    o    10 characters or more

    o    At least one uppercase letter

    o    At least one lowercase letter

    o    At least one number

    o    At least one special character


    Multifactor authentication
    Multifactor authentication requires additional information (e.g., a security code sent to your phone) to log in. Check with your vendors that handle sensitive data, especially financial institutions, to see if they offer multifactor authentication for your account.

    Protect sensitive data and back up the rest

    Back up your data
    Regularly back up the data on all computers. Critical data includes word processing documents, electronic spreadsheets, databases, financial files, human resources files, and accounts receivable/payable files. Back up data automatically if possible, or at least weekly, and store the copies either offsite or on the cloud.

    Secure payment processing
    Work with your banks or card processors to ensure the most trusted and validated tools and anti-fraud services are being used. You may also have additional security obligations related to agreements with your bank or processor. Isolate payment systems from other, less secure programs and do not use the same computer to process payments and surf the Internet.

    Control physical access
    Prevent access or use of business computers by unauthorized individuals. Laptops can be particularly easy targets for theft or can be lost, so lock them up when unattended. Make sure a separate user account is created for each employee and require strong passwords. Administrative privileges should only be given to trusted IT staff and key personnel.


  • 12 Sep 2021 8:36 AM | Dawn Hargrove-Avery (Administrator)

    “The SBA’s COVID Economic Injury Disaster Loan program offers a lifeline to millions of small businesses who are still being impacted by the pandemic,” SBA Administrator Isabella Casillas Guzman said. “We’ve retooled this critical program – increasing the borrowing limit to $2 million, offering 24 months of deferment, and expanding flexibility to allow borrowers to pay down higher-interest business debt. We have also ramped up our outreach efforts to ensure we’re connecting with our smallest businesses as well as those from low-income communities who may also be eligible for the companion COVID EIDL Targeted Advance and Supplemental Advance grants totaling up to $15,000. Our mission-driven SBA team has been working around the clock to make the loan review process as user-friendly as possible to ensure every entrepreneur who needs help can get the capital they need to reopen, recover and rebuild.”

    Increasing the COVID EIDL Cap. The SBA will lift the COVID EIDL cap from $500,000 to $2 million. Loan funds can be used for any normal operating expenses and working capital, including payroll, purchasing equipment, and paying debt.

    Implementation of a Deferred Payment Period. The SBA will ensure small business owners will not have to begin COVID EIDL repayment until two years after loan origination so that they can get through the pandemic without having to worry about making ends meet.

    Establishment of a 30-Day Exclusivity Window. To ensure Main Street businesses have additional time to access these funds, the SBA will implement a 30-day exclusivity window of approving and disbursing funds for loans of $500,000 or less. Approval and disbursement of loans over $500,000 will begin after the 30-day period.

    Expansion of Eligible Use of Funds. COVID EIDL funds will now be eligible to prepay commercial debt and make payments on federal business debt.

    Simplification of affiliation requirements. To ease the COVID EIDL application process for small businesses, the SBA has established more simplified affiliation requirements to model those of the Restaurant Revitalization Fund.

    How to apply

    Eligible small businesses, nonprofits, and agricultural businesses in all U.S. states and territories can apply. Visit www.sba.gov/eidl to learn more about eligibility and application requirements. The last day that applications may be received is December 31, 2021. All applicants should file their applications as soon as possible.

    For additional information on COVID EIDL and other recovery programs please visit www.sba.gov/relief. Small business owners may call SBA’s Customer Service Center at 1-800-659-2955 (1-800-877-8339 for the deaf and hard of hearing) or email DisasterCustomerService@sba.gov for additional assistance. The center is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. EST. Multilingual representatives are available. Small business owners may also contact SBA’s Resource Partners by visiting www.sba.gov/local-assistance.

    FAQ

    Updates



  • 10 Sep 2021 12:30 PM | Dawn Hargrove-Avery (Administrator)

    When steam travels through equipment and transfers heat, it reverts to a liquid phase called steam condensate. Returning this hot condensate to the boiler is important for several reasons. As more condensate is returned, less make-up water is required, saving fuel, water, and chemical treatment costs. Significant fuel savings occur as most returned condensate is relatively hot (130°F.-225°F.), reducing the amount of cold make-up water (50°F-60°F.) that must be heated to make steam.

    When the hot condensate returns to the boiler, it gets stored in a vessel that is known as a condensate or return tank (see illustration). When the boiler requires make-up water, the hot condensate is pumped into the boiler. If the level of the water in the tank drops below the required level, fresh water is fed into the tank.

    Components of the condensate return system:

    1. Condensate Return Tank. This is the vessel that holds the condensate that will be fed into the boiler as make-up water.

    2. Float Valve. The float valve maintains the water level in the tank. When the water level drops below the desired level, the float valve will let fresh water into the tank until the correct level is reached.

    3. Sight glass. The sight glass will show the level of condensate that is in the tank.

    4. Condensate pump. When the boiler requires make-up water, the condensate pump pumps the condensate from the tank into the boiler.

    5. Strainer and strainer cleanout. The strainer is a screen that traps debris such as sediment and rust, keeping it out of the pump and boiler.

    6. Condensate return flash tube. This is where the hot condensate enters the return tank.

    7. Vent. The vent allows pressure to be released from the tank and keeps the return system from “air locking” by displacing lost water with air.

    8. Drain valve. This valve is to be opened when the tank is drained.

    9. Shutoff valve. This valve shuts off the flow of water to the pump. This valve is normally open. It is closed when the pump is to be serviced or removed.

    Maintenance:

    1 The return tank should be examined for signs of leaks (from corrosion). The tank should be drained out periodically to remove any rust or sediment.

    2. If the water level is not being maintained, or if the tank overflows, the float valve may need to be adjusted or replaced. The float works on the same principle as the float valve found in toilet tanks.

    3. If the sight glass is leaking, it must be replaced.

    4. Check the pump for leaks. If the pump leaks, the seals must be replaced. Listen for any grinding sounds. This could mean that sediment has collected in the impellers. Lubricate the pump as instructed.


  • 7 Sep 2021 8:28 AM | Dawn Hargrove-Avery (Administrator)

    The Small Business Administration is expected to lift the cap on its Covid Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDL) sometime after Labor Day on September 6, bringing the low-interest long term loan available to any small businesses struggling amid the pandemic back up to $2 million. 

    The cap was set at $500,000 in March 2021, after the SBA spent several months approving only loans of up to $150,000. Traditionally, the EIDL loan program--which has a 30-year maturity date--has a $2 million cap and loan interest terms that range from 2.75 percent for nonprofits to 3.75 percent for businesses.

    Despite the promising news, not every business will have access to the expanded funds. The amount for which you qualify now is based on your 2019 total revenue minus your cost of goods sold, less any EIDL already received. Plus, it's not yet clear what the requirements will be regarding whether you have to prove economic injury. You may have to show your 2020 numbers and demonstrate financial loss to get any kind of supplemental EIDL.

    Read More

  • 11 Aug 2021 2:27 PM | Dawn Hargrove-Avery (Administrator)

    The PPP Loan Forgiveness Portal is now open. The Paycheck Protection Program Direct Forgiveness Portal is a US Small Business Administration (SBA) initiative.

    The new application portal streamlines applications for loans that are $150,000 or less for more than 6.5 million businesses. It enables business to apply for forgiveness directly through the SBA.

    A Streamlined Approach

    The initiative will therefore allow PPP borrowers to put their full forgiveness borrowing concerns behind them. Instead, they will be able to concentrate about operating and growing their business.

    Isabel Casillas Guzman, SBA administrator, commented on the aim of the new portal and how it will assist small businesses in the borrowing process: ““The SBA’s new streamlined application portal will simplify forgiveness for millions of our smallest businesses – including many sole proprietors – who used funds from our Paycheck Protection Program loans to survive the pandemic.

    “The vast majority of businesses waiting for forgiveness have loans under $150,000. These entrepreneurs are busy running their businesses and are challenged by an overly complicated forgiveness process. We need to deliver forgiveness more efficiently so they can get back to enlivening our Main Streets, sustaining our neighborhoods and fueling our nation’s economy,” Isabel Casillas Guzman continued.

    So far in 2021, the SBA has approved more than 6.5 million loans, totalling over $275 billion. 96% of these loans have gone to businesses with less than 20 employees.

    More than 600 banks have opted into the direct forgiveness program, allowing more than 2.17 million borrowers to apply through the portal. This figure represents 30% of loans.

    You can read more by clicking here

Stay informed
Subscribe to our newsletter and stay up-to-date with the latest developments. Be a part of our business community. 

Our sponsors & partners



ABOUT ASSOCIATION

FAQ's

Membership

Information

CONTACTS

info@nca-i.com
212.967.3002
2218 Broadway, Frnt 2 New York, NY 10024

GET INVOLVED


Copyright © National Cleaners Association 2009-2022

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software